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January 20, 2018 Saturday 02:37:17 PM IST
11,000-yr-old baby tomb found in China

Beijing: Archaeologists in China's Guizhou province have confirmed that a tomb dating back to 11,000 years contains the remains of a toddler. The tomb is located in a cave in Yankong village. Researchers are working to determine whether it is the oldest known tomb in the province, Xinhua news agency reported.

DNA studies identified the remains contained in the tomb to be from a child under two years old, according to the provincial institute of cultural relics and archaeology. The cave, believed to have been used by humans as early as the late Paleolithic Age, was found in March 2016. The tomb was found in July 2017.  Researchers found a large number of stone implements from the Paleolithic and Neolithic ages as well as bone objects and tools for hunting, said Zhang Xinglong, Associate Researcher with the institute.


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