Teacher Insights: How Digital Technology Helps in Growth and Access to Quality Education  |  Management lessons: How Brands Use CARE to Stay on Top in Instagram  |  Hobbies &Trends: At Full Throttle  |  Finance: Bitcoin Mobile Apps Vulnerable to Security Threats: Guan-Hua Tu, MSU  |  International Edu News: Use plants' ability to tell the time to make food production more sustainable  |  International Edu News: Scientists develop new class of cancer drug with potential to treat leukaemia  |  International Edu News: Loan applications processed around midday more likely to be rejected  |  International Edu News: Researchers find climate change impacts plankton – a key marine food source  |  International Edu News: Nature must be a partner, not just a provider of services – Oxford report  |  National Edu News: Approval to MoU between India and UK on Global Innovation Partnership  |  National Edu News: Transfer of CSIR-CMERI technologies to three MSMEs  |  Parent Interventions: Child Learning Programs: How to Find the Right One for You  |  Rajagiri Round Table: Fitness Challenge for the Nation  |  Education Information: West Bengal Scholarship 2021  |  Education Information: What is PMEGP Scheme? How can you get it?  |  
September 13, 2019 Friday 12:30:55 PM IST

New way to strengthen metals

Science Innovations

Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have demonstrated that the rules of metal-bending aren't so hard and fast after all. They have described the phenomena in the journal Nature Communications.

Normal metals bend because dislocations are able to move, allowing a material to deform without ripping apart every single bond inside its crystal lattice at once.

Strengthening techniques typically restrict the motion of dislocations. So it was quite a shock when researchers discovered that the material samarium cobalt - known as an intermetallic - bent easily, even though its dislocations were locked in place.

Instead, bending samarium cobalt caused narrow bands to form inside the crystal lattice, where molecules assumed a free-form ‘amorphous’ configuration instead of the regular, grid-like structure in the rest of the metal. Those amorphous bands allowed the metal to bend.


Their surprising discovery not only upends previous notions about how metals deform, but could help guide the creation of stronger, more durable materials.

Comments